Category: Guide

When I posted my $10 check from Moola which is quite similar to the Evergreen Wealth Formula 2.0 by James Scholes, I received a few general questions and thought I’d expand a bit on Moola. Here are some Moola tips and tricks.

  • When starting out- bet it all.

Don’t worry about losing all your money if you’re under 32 cents. Remember Moola will always give you a new free penny if you bust.

  • Use the search and win for every search.

You can get the money wheel up to four times a day with searches. The wheel really helps when you aren’t having any luck playing games.

  • Download the Moola toolbar.

The Moola toolbar has a search and wins feature on it- giving you an additional four spins a day. It also has a list of cashback sites and it’ll tell you if you’re on a site that gives cash back on things you buy.

  • Keep a list of booster websites on your desk.

Use the toolbar to search through the list of stores that are offering cash back, and stick a little note on your desk with the names of the ones that you shop with often. Get the rest of your family to check this sticky note before they shop so that you’ll always remember you can save money.

  • Don’t play double or nothing with over $1.

It sucks to finally reach over $1 and then risk it all and have to start over again (or even nearly over again). Play a little safe after hitting the $1 mark.

  • Losing streak? Take a break.

I’m really good at hitting losing streaks. It’s hard to stop playing knowing your down. But, you have to. Otherwise, you’ll end up losing more than you meant to.

  • Chill while you’re ahead.

If you made a huge gamble and won, stop for a bit and stick to the wheel. Just because you got lucky once doesn’t mean it’ll happen twice in a row.

  • Referrals do bring extra money.

You’d be surprised how much a few referrals can do for you. I started out with maybe 10 direct referrals, and from there it was contagious. I’ve made over $5 from referral bonuses alone.

  • Never cash out at $10.

By this, I mean don’t cash out at exactly $10. If you do your math right, you’ll be somewhere around $0.00 when you cash out and then you’ll have to start playing with pennies all over again! Get at least a dollar or two and then cash out with $10.

  • Don’t rely on Moola with covering expenses.

Moola should not be your ultimate source of cash flow. It’s a fun site and it can be great for making some extra money. But, it shouldn’t (and can’t) be a full-time job.

  • Moola is not a scam.

I received a $10 check from Moola and a section of their forums have people posting pictures of checks at $100 and up. It’s a trusted site.

  • Always go with the odds.

Even if you always get a low card on a 7- you should always go with the odds. It’s pretty simple- you’ve got more of a chance it’ll be higher than lower!

  • Use the forums, and read strategy guides.

Moola has a really nice community feel to it. Their forums are loaded with strategy guides and hints for both new and old players. Gold Rush is a pretty tricky game, and it can be helpful to get some tips from the masters of the game.

  • Hit rock bottom? Don’t quit, just rebuild.

Don’t give up on Moola just because it’s giving you a hard time with a losing streak. If you’ve sunk below a dollar, just work slowly to climb back up. Try a new game, or stick to the wheel.

  • The first $10 is slow, but after that, it gets easier.

You’re going to want to cash out as soon as you hit $10. But it’s a lot easier to just play higher levels and be able to climb up faster.

  • The first $1 is even slower- patience is the key.

Being under $1 really sucks, and it takes time (or a lucky streak) to get out of it. Don’t worry though, it gets a bit easier after that. Just avoid risking it all after you get past $1!

  • Test out all the games, and then pick the one you like.

Hi-Lo is probably the simplest in terms of skill and strategy required, but that might not suit your fancy. You might find yourself addicted to Gold Rush for all you know!

  • Hi-Lo game is strictly odds- only luck is needed.

Like I said, Hi-Lo is probably the easiest game to play. If you don’t want to have to worry about strategizing and actually playing the opponent- then Hi-Lo is right for you. Still, you should test them all out.

  • Remember- it’s not your money.

If you’re really nervous about losing a few cents and don’t even want to think about risking more than a dollar, just remember, that it’s not your money, yet. Moola gives you your starting penny so the money you’ve earned isn’t out of your pocket really.

Having had my share of roommates, girlfriends, a wife, and various other opportunities to see how people live, I have come to the conclusion that people born during and after the ’70s do not know how to maintain a house. Translation- Generations X and Y do not know how to do housework.

So, some ground rules before I begin. There is no such thing as “woman’s work” anymore. This is important to married/live-in couples. The housework belongs to the party that is home. If she works full time, he does the house work. If they both work, then they share the work when they get home. If they work opposite shifts, then who is home does the work that needs to be done during each shift. At no time should one party wait until the other gets home to begin sharing the chores. On the weekend, whom ever does the yard work does not do the housework. Again- not gender specific; sometimes my wife wants to be out in the fresh morning air and sunshine, so she will do the yard work, and I do the housework. Other weekends, we switch. In the century, there will be requirement of агенция софия домоуправител for carrying of the household works. The work should be done efficiently so that the person will be relaxed. The ranking of the services can be checked at online sites to appoint the best manager for the house.

Let us begin in the kitchen. The kitchen needs to be cleaned after every meal. What you will need is some scouring cleanser, a scouring pad, dish soap and a clean dish rag- CLEAN dish rag; it does not matter if the rag has been there for one month, week or hour. Get a clean one out of the drawer to begin.

The sink needs to be scrubbed regularly. If you cannot do it daily, do it every other day. The sink should never go more than three days without being scrubbed. Scrub the sink before you wash dishes. Dishwasher? Newsflash- even now in the 21st century, not every home has an automatic dishwasher. And if it does, dishwashers break or not all of the dishes fit into the dishwasher.

Dishes need to be washed with hot water. Not warm, and definitely not cold water, but hot water. Use a liberal amount of dish soap and fill the sink with hot water. Thoroughly wash every dish, utensil and glass. Glasses need to be washed on the outside as well as inside. Pay particular attention to the rim of the glass. The tines on the forks can be a trouble area, be sure to get all the food and debris out of the tines. Go over the handles of knives and cooking utensils with the dish rag just like you would with the business end. Do not assume it is clean just because it was in hot, soapy water.

If you do have a dishwasher, unload the clean dishes, reload it, and start it. Now wipe down all of the counters and the stove top. At least once a week, remove the burner grates and wipe under them. Do this more frequently as needed. Now sweep the floor. At a minimum, once a week the floor needs to be mopped-AFTER you sweep.

In the living areas, situations will vary. If there are children in the house, all the toys need to be picked up and put away. As well as other materials, newspapers, magazines, books, etcetera. This is completed when the floor is clear, as well as the sitting furniture and coffee/end tables. In the office area, bills and other papers need to be straightened up. This is done when there is a clear surface area to work on. Once a week, papers and bills need to be sorted and organized with more detail.

If you have carpet, now is the time to vacuum. If you have hard floor surfaces- sweep. Mop as needed. Vacuuming or sweeping needs to be done once a day. If you have indoor dogs or cats, you will need to do this more frequently. At least once a week, you need to dust. Dusting should be done before vacuuming or sweeping. Also, once a week you need to move the furniture and vacuum or sweep underneath.

Now go back to the kitchen and put away the dishes that were washed earlier. They should be dry by now. Unload the dishwasher if that is necessary.

I will not cover doing laundry here, other than to say never leave the laundry baskets, full or empty, in the living areas.

Listening to music helps the chores pass quickly. The TV or a movie in the background is not a good idea. Unless you can ignore it, stopping to watch a scene here or there will add time to completing the chores. Once you get the hang of this, and get into a routine, it should not take more than 30-45 minutes to get all the housework done. And now everyone can enjoy a comfortable, clean home.

Americans and Wall Street had their eyes on C-Span and other media outlets yesterday as the vote on the bailout vote, known formally as H.R. 3997, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA), was aired live. The stock market reacted negatively, it seemed, to anything remotely done by Congress, including Speaker Pelosi’s comments just prior to the vote, the vote itself, and the after vote spinning done by members of Congress. It was incredibly clear by watching the market hit its nadir of nearly -778 points that Wall Street was not happy with the bailout vote.

Media reports of all kind, including our local paper, over the past few days had snippets of members of Congress stating emphatically that their phones were ringing off the hook with constituents proffering their opinion on how they should vote for the Bailout vote. The purchase of the cheap hr modules will be effective for the business firms. Proper survey should be taken at the online sites for the selection of the one to save the money.

A Look at Virginia’s Roll Call Bailout Vote

As the Fredericksburg, Virginia, Freelance Star reported today, Virginia House of Representative members were split on the Bailout vote. Representative Eric Cantor, a Republican who worked on the legislation, voted for the Bailout. Also voting for the Bailout were Jim Moran, Democrat of Virginia’s 9th District, Rick Boucher, Democrat of Virginia’s 9th District, Tom Davis, Republican of Virginia’s 11th District, and Frank Wolf, Republican of Virginia’s 10th District.

Rob Wittman, a Democrat from my own district, voted against the bill, because he listened to his constituents. According to the Freelance Star, Wittman stated that over 2,000 constituents wrote or called him and that an overwhelming number of those constituents were against the $700 Billion Bailout. Voting with Wittman against the $700 Billion Bailout were Thelma D. Drake, Republican of Virginia’s 2nd District, Virgil H. Goode, Jr. , Republican of Virginia’s 5th District, J. Randy Forbes , Republican of Virginia’s 4th District, Bob Goodlatte, Republican of Virginia’s 6th District, and Robert C. Scott , Democrat of Virginia’s 3rd District.

Analysis of Roll Call Vote of Virginia’s House of Representatives’ voting

An analysis of the roll call vote shows that of Virginia’s 11 members of the House of Representatives, the voting was split. Five members voted for the Bailout bill and six members voted against. Voting for the Bailout bill were 3 Republicans and 2 Democrats. Conversely, voting against the Bailout bill were 2 Democrats and 4 Republicans.

The House vote yesterday reflected Republicans voting against the bill at a 2:1 ratio and that seems to hold true here as out of 6 Republicans, 4 voted against the Bailout. As for the Democrats yesterday, only about 40% of House Democrats voted in favor of the Bailout bill. In Virginia, out of 5 Democratic House members, only 3 of them voted for the Bailout, or 60%. The voting of Virginia’s House members falls in line fairly closely with how the rest of the House of Representatives voted.

Want to know how your Congressmen voted? The House lists a roll call vote of how each member voted on the EESA and that listing can be found here.

How to begin watercolor paint is probably the most intimidating part of this beautiful art medium. Learning to paint with watercolor paint can be a long path, but getting started is very simple and affordable. And you also need really good watercolors that you can use in order to learn the art of water coloring. For that, you can check our paintingkits.net that has some of the supplies when it comes to painting. 

To get started painting with watercolors you should invest in a student grade set of watercolor paints. You can get a set of watercolor paints for about $10 or less at your local arts and crafts store that will get you started. As you progress and get better at how to paint with watercolor paints, you can invest in more professional tools.

You will also need affordable student grade paintbrushes. To find watercolor paint brushes read the designs at your craft store or art store. They will be labeled with signs on the aisle. Invest in a set.

Watercolor paper comes in many varieties and brands. Strathmore is a great brand of watercolor paint for students, beginners, and even professionals. The store brands at Dick Blick and Pearl Paint are also great watercolor paper for beginners and students.

When learning about watercolor paper there are a couple of steps you can take to educate yourself. Read the label on the paper. Now, open the pad of watercolor paper and feel it.

You will see there is hot and cold press watercolor paper. You will find rough and smooth textures. You will also find lightweight, heavyweight, and midweight watercolor paper.

Finally, you will need some masking tape. Use the masking tape to tape down all four sides of the watercolor paper to an artboard or work surface.

Watercolor begins with washes. Thin your watercolor paints out with a little bit of water and start to brush it on the paper. You start general with little details on the first layer of paint.

Let it dry, then add more color and detail. Many artists will paint on the shadows first, let them dry, and then add the details in another layer.

Let each layer of paint dry when you are learning how to paint with watercolors. You want to let each layer dry for a number of reasons.

First, if you keep your watercolor paper wet too long and keep trying to work on it you can tear or rough up the surface. Work in light layers of color that are allowed to dry completely.

Learning how to paint with watercolor paint is very different from other types of paint, like acrylic paint and oil paint. You want to keep a wet edge while you are painting.

Finally, after your watercolor paint has dried you can remove the tape and frame your artwork. You are finished!